Volume 26, Issue 4 p. 463-473
Clinical Research

The Effects of an Oral Supplement Enriched With Fish Oil, Prebiotics, and Antioxidants on Nutrition Status in Crohn's Disease Patients

Dawn M. Wiese MD

Corresponding Author

Dawn M. Wiese MD

Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

Dawn Wiese, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, B-510 TVC, Box 396, Nashville, TN 37232-5283; e-mail: [email protected].Search for more papers by this author
Bret A. Lashner MD, MPH

Bret A. Lashner MD, MPH

Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

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Edith Lerner PhD

Edith Lerner PhD

Department of Nutrition, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

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Stephen J. DeMichele PhD

Stephen J. DeMichele PhD

Abbott Nutrition, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio

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Douglas L. Seidner MD

Douglas L. Seidner MD

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

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First published: 20 July 2011
Citations: 14

Abstract

Background: Research in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) supports anti-inflammatory benefits of n-3 fatty acids from fish oil, prebiotics, and antioxidants. A nutritionally balanced inflammatory bowel disease nutrition formula (IBDNF) enriched with these compounds has the potential to improve nutrition status and disease activity in CD. Methods: This is an open-label pilot study investigating the effects of IBDNF on nutrition status in CD patients. Twenty-eight patients with active CD on stable medication were asked to consume 16 oz of IBDNF/d for 4 months. Nutrition status was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and serum micronutrient levels. Disease activity and quality of life were measured using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). Results: Twenty patients completed the final visit. After 4 months, there was a significant decrease in plasma phospholipid levels of arachidonic acid with increases in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid. Ten patients had a final EPA concentration of >2%. There was improvement in fat-free and fat mass in patients with final EPA >2% (P = .014 and P = .05). Vitamin D (25-OH) levels improved in all patients (18.5–25.9 ng/mL, P < .001). Those with EPA >2% had significantly lower CDAI (116 ± 94.5 vs 261.8 ± 86.5; P = .005) and higher IBDQ (179.1 ± 26.6 vs 114.6 ± 35.9, P < .001) compared to those with EPA <2%. Conclusions: IBDNF has the potential to deposit fat-free and fat mass, improve vitamin D status, and improve quality of life in CD patients.